Nextworm

Climate change is making it harder for aircrafts to take off

Today, approximately 89% of long distance travelers prefer air travel over other travel means. This increase in demand for air travel can be attributed to the short travel time that is associated with airplanes. People use this means not only for international travel but also for traveling locally. However, with the increase in pollution levels, this convenience will soon be out of reach.

The increase in gas emission in the atmosphere has harmfully affected the Ozone layer, which indirectly has resulted in an increase in temperature. Actually, the emission is the main reason behind climate change. This abrupt change in the climatic patterns has in turn brought complications during takeoff for airplanes and even necessitated a restructuring of takeoff procedures.

According to New York Times, Airline corporations in America canceled a greater amount of flights nationally this year. This step was taken due to the abrupt change in climate. It further adds that the temperature recorded at day time was above 120 degrees. The increase in the hotness of air actually makes it too thin to fly on it.

Due to the rapid increase in temperature, ample amount of flights are canceled. This might also indirectly affect the fares of smaller airlines. Sometimes ago, air travel was regarded as safe and cheap but with the rate at which climate is changing today, air travel will become more dangerous and costly.

Apparently, airports with shorter runways will be greatly affected by this changes in climate. Take offs, for not only smaller airplanes but commercial airplanes are becoming too difficult. In order to ensure the safety of their passenger’s, lots of airports will now require improvements and renovations.

In order to save the world from this rising problem, we might need to take serious steps. The use of Fossil fuel must be reduced. Trees should be planted so that the abrupt change in climate can be reduced. This way, we will ensure that climatic conditions don’t get to such alarming levels.

Peter Mukaka